Monday, October 20, 2014

Nina: Glossy Magazine For Arab Women Launched In London

This came in from Karen Dabrowski:


Nina, a glossy magazine for Arab women everywhere was launched at London’s Iraqi Cultural Centre by the Editor- in- chief Madeleine White and Deputy Editor and Arabic specialist Sana Bekki.

The first issue of the colour bi lingual magazine included an interview with internationally renowned Iraqi-born architect Dame Zaha Hadid who conveyed a message of inspiration to Iraqi women stressing the importance of education. She said :”I believe education is so important allowing all young people to explore the future possibilities and learn from history, especially now where we are on a global stage. I see women around the world as being smart, gifted and tough but a good education can open ideas and opportunities. Secondly never give up. I am extremely grateful for my success but architecture is a tough profession, so it has been a struggle. I think it is very important to have the commitment to persevere and to have a strong belief in yourself. As a woman, you need the confidence that you can carry on and take new steps every time. You can’t always get everything right every time – but you have to keep trying.”

There is also an interview with one of the sponsors Iraqi billionaire industrialist Faruk Mustafa Rasool who points out that in Iraq there are quotas that 25 percent of politicians should be made of women. However , often women in positions of political power are there because of connections. I believe this is wrong. There should be professionalism in all areas of life.”

Nouriya Shaya, the first female bank manager in Iraq who will turn 90 this year tells her story as does Asmahan Nasir a 30-year-old widow who returned to her work as a hairdresser.

Nina has an impressive, growing strategic partnerships network. An MOU was signed recently with the Iraqi Business Council in Jordan and there are also strategic partnerships with Asiacell, Afren, Chamber Trade Sweden and Microsoft.

Issue two, focusing on the environment, will be published in December.

www.nina-iraq.com 

Monday, February 10, 2014

FINAL CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR 2014 INTERNATIONAL MEDIA AWARDS

The Next Century Foundation wishes to issue a final call for nominations for the 2014 International Media Awards. With shortlisting due to take place by mid-February, nominations sent in after Friday, 14 February will not be considered. This year's awards will be held on May 10, 2014.

The International Media Awards are presented at a ceremony held each year by the International Council for Press and Broadcasting, a subsidiary body of the Next Century Foundation. The awards honour editors, journalists, TV producers and broadcasters in recognition of the vital role that the media can play in fostering understanding, the essential pre-requisite of any peace process.

The Award categories are: Lifetime Achievement, Peace Through Media, Cutting Edge, Breakaway, New Media, Photography and Visual Media, and Outstanding Contribution to Broadcasting and Media

Please send your nominations, and if possible a short biography of the nominees and why you are nominating them, to the International Media Awards via ncfmediagroup@aol.com.

For further information about the International Media Awards, visit www.internationalmediaawards.org

You may remember that the 2013 winners were:
 
Peace Through Media Award
  • PAT LANCASTER, editor of Middle East Magazine.
  • IGAL SARNA, columnist for Yediot Ahronot.
  • WAEL DAHDOUH, Al Jazeera correspondent in Gaza.
Photography and Visual Media Award
  • DON MCCULLIN, photojournalist and author. 
Lifetime Achievement
  • BENJAMIN POGRUND, contributor for the Guardian and previous sub-editor on the Independent foreign desk.
The Cutting Edge Award
  • LINA SINJAB, Damascus correspondent for the BBC.
  • RACHEL SHABI, journalist and author of ‘Not the Enemy: Israel’s Jews from Arab Lands’
  • NABILA RAMDANI, columnist and broadcaster for BBC and Al Jazeera.
The New Media Award
  • MAHMOUD AL YOUSIF, blogger. 
The Breakaway Award
  • GEORGE BUTLER, war artist.
Award for Outstanding Achievement
  • RANIA ALATTAR, journalist for BBC Arabic.

Friday, January 10, 2014

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR 2014 INTERNATIONAL MEDIA AWARDS

The Next Century Foundation wishes to remind you that the nominations for the 2014 International Media Awards will remain open to the public until the end of January. This year's awards will be held on May 10.

The International Media Awards are presented at a ceremony held each year by the International Council for Press and Broadcasting, a subsidiary body of the Next Century Foundation. The awards honour editors, journalists, TV producers and broadcasters in recognition of the vital role that the media can play in fostering understanding, the essential pre-requisite of any peace process.

The Award categories are: Lifetime Achievement, Peace Through Media, Cutting Edge, Breakaway, New Media, Photography and Visual Media, and Outstanding Contribution to Broadcasting and Media

Please send your nominations, and if possible a short biography of the nominees and why you are nominating them, to the International Media Awards via ncfmediagroup@aol.com.

For further information about the International Media Awards, visit www.internationalmediaawards.org

You may remember that the 2013 winners were:
 
Peace Through Media Award
  • PAT LANCASTER, editor of Middle East Magazine.
  • IGAL SARNA, columnist for Yediot Ahronot.
  • WAEL DAHDOUH, Al Jazeera correspondent in Gaza.
Photography and Visual Media Award
  • DON MCCULLIN, photojournalist and author. 
Lifetime Achievement
  • BENJAMIN POGRUND, contributor for the Guardian and previous sub-editor on the Independent foreign desk.
The Cutting Edge Award
  • LINA SINJAB, Damascus correspondent for the BBC.
  • RACHEL SHABI, journalist and author of ‘Not the Enemy: Israel’s Jews from Arab Lands’
  • NABILA RAMDANI, columnist and broadcaster for BBC and Al Jazeera.
The New Media Award
  • MAHMOUD AL YOUSIF, blogger. 
The Breakaway Award
  • GEORGE BUTLER, war artist.
Award for Outstanding Achievement 
 
RANIA ALATTAR, journalist for BBC Arabic.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA AWARDS 2014

The Next Century Foundation is delighted to announce that the nominations for the International Media Awards 2014 are now open to the public. They will close by the end of this year on 31st December 2013.

The International Media Awards are presented at a ceremony held each year by the International Council for Press and Broadcasting, a subsidiary body of the Next Century Foundation. The awards honour editors, journalists, TV producers and broadcasters in recognition of the vital role that the media can play in fostering understanding, the essential pre-requisite of any peace process.

Please send your nominations, and if possible a short biography of the nominees and why you are nominating them, to the International Media Awards via ncfmediagroup@aol.com.

For further information about the International Media Awards, visit www.internationalmediaawards.org

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Russell Twisk - A Tribute



It is with great sadness that we report the death of Next Century Foundation Board Member, Mr Russell Twisk. Russell was formerly editor of the Listener and of the Reader's Digest Magazine (during Russell's time at the Reader's Digest he turned it into Britain's best selling periodical). He was also a member of the Board of the Press Complaints Commission and President of the Media Society, as well as serving on our own International Council for Press and Broadcasting and as a Board Member of the International Communications Forum.

Russell was a great campaigner for the best standards of journalism and worked tirelessly to promote improved standards of Media Ethics. Russell was a strong believer in rapprochement between nations which was what led him to become one of the founding members of the Next Century Foundation. One of his last public appearances was to present the Peace Through Media Award to Dov Alfon, the Editor in Chief of Haaretz, at the International Media Awards. Russell will be sorely missed.

Tributes to Russell can be found on the pages of the Next Century Foundation, Media Society and International Media Awards websites as well as on the obituaries pages of The Times and the UK Press Gazette

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Thank Heavens they sold the Washington Post

The Washington Post has been sold to the Amazon boss (who can afford a few losses) and how good is that? It is a great professional world beating newspaper but it has been in decline for the best part of a decade. The cash injection that the Amazon boss can bring - combined with his sheer energy - should breathe new life into this splendid newspaper.



The Guardian Newspaper writes:

The Washington Post is to be sold to Jeff Bezos, the founder of the web retail giant Amazon, in a move that has shocked even seasoned observers of the turmoil in the US newspaper industry.
The agreement to sell one of the legendary titles in American newspapers brings to an end the 80-year control of the paper by the Graham family which steered the Post to national prominence through such landmark journalism as Watergate in 1972. The deal was conducted in such secrecy that even the Post's own stable of investigative reporters were taken by surprise when the paper published on its website a story about the transfer.

"This is absolutely stunning news," the media commentator Jim Romenesko told the Guardian. "Just as surprising is that it didn't leak in a building filled with investigative reporters."

According to the Post's own account, the initiative for a sale came from the Graham family and not from Bezos. Donald Graham, chief executive of the Washington Post Co which currently owns the title, used an investment firm to approach six "potential suitors" amid tightest security before choosing Bezos.
The sale price was set at $250m, a relatively small sum for such a legendary institution – 1% of Bezos's enormous personal wealth as put by Bloomberg at $22bn. The figure elegantly captures the dire economic state of many of America's leading news titles, coming as it does just days after the sale of the Boston Globe by the New York Times Co to the owner of the Red Sox, John Henry, for an even more paltry $70m.
Graham told his own newspaper that after four generations of ownership in the family, "every member of my family started out with the same emotion – shock – in even thinking about selling the Post. But when the idea of a transaction with Jeff Bezos came up, it altered my feelings."

Graham added: "The Post could have survived under the company's ownership and been profitable for the foreseeable future. But we wanted to do more than survive."

According to the Post article, Katharine Weymouth, Graham's niece, will continue to act as publisher and chief executive of the newspaper following its transfer to Bezos. "No layoffs are contemplated as a result of the transaction," the paper said. The Grahams will retain control of the Slate website, the Kaplan education business and, for now at least, the building that houses the Post in Washington, which is for sale.

The end of the Graham dynasty is the latest in a long line of family proprietorships that have succumbed in the face of the economic strife that has swept through traditional newspaper businesses in the US with the advent of the internet. The many casualties include the Bancroft family that sold the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones to Rupert Murdoch in 2007, leaving the Sulzberger family still at the helm at the New York Times as stalwart examples of a dying breed.

At the other end of the extraordinary convulsion in fortunes brought by the digital revolution is Bezos himself, who started Amazon out of a garage of his home in Washington state in 1994. Since then he has torn a strip through the book publishing industry and through conventional retailing businesses that have struggled to keep up with his flexibility and taste for innovation.

Bezos told the Post that as its new owner he would be entering "uncharted terrain" that would "require experimentation". He tried to assuage those who fear his reign might bring editorial interference by saying "there would be change with our without new ownership. But the key thing I hope people will take away from this is that the values of the Post do not need changing. The duty of the paper is to the readers, not the owners."

The sale came as a complete surprise to almost all of the Post staff, and stunned the US media world. "This whole thing happened with admirable and amazing secrecy," said Jeff Jarvis, associate professor of journalism at City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism.

Jarvis expressed reservations about the Post being owned by the CEO of Amazon, a relatively secretive company. "Bezos doesn't believe in openness. And that somewhat worries me. Both with how a newspaper operates, how a Washington institution operates and also with the need for business model experimentation to occur in the open for the good of the entire industry."

But Jarvis said that on balance, he said the sale was a good thing. "Bezos is incredibly smart, a nice man. He's terribly successful, he has the resources to do this, I think all in all, at first rush it seems like a good idea."

Bezos's purchase follows a recent trend of wealthy businessmen buying up newspapers. Last week John Henry, the Red Sox owner and Fenway Sports Group mogul, bought the Boston Globe and its websites for $70m, beating off competition from half a dozen rival bidders.

In July Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway company – a major shareholder in the Washington Post Company – bought the Press of Atlantic City. Last year the billionaire investor bought 63 Media General newspapers for $142m, and in 2011 bought the Omaha World Herald for $200m.
"I would hate to think that the only way for news organisations to survive is by way of sugar daddies. That also brings its own set of problems," Jarvis said. "But the Post didn't have a clear strategy for where to go and private ownership does protect it.

Thursday, July 25, 2013

How Others See Us

The Islamic Republic's State TV has an interesting take on the Royal baby. We are told:

 Nothing could have manifested English people's hatred of their monarchy as much as the birth of this baby

England has one of the most reactionary and medieval forms of governments.

The Queen reigns as an absolute dictator in this country

For the full report see Potkin's blog
http://www.azarmehr.info/2013/07/islamic-republic-state-tv-special.html